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Thread: Is it possible to play decent golf with an early release

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    Default Is it possible to play decent golf with an early release

    If you physically can't hold the angle long enough in the downswing and get an arched left wrist into impact, then what type of things should you be doing to make decent ball contact and play golf with an early release?

    For example should you learn to pick the ball (less down), put the ball in a certain position in your stance, etc., etc..

    Basically, what should you try to do to better hustle your ball around a golf course and play decent golf with an early release?
    Last edited by Keefer; 04-03-2014 at 07:08 AM.

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    Get good with the driver (easy to do swinging left enough off of a tee) and have a great short game. Don't ask me how I know.
    Last edited by jbrunk; 04-03-2014 at 09:10 PM.
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    Senior Member Erik_K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keefer View Post
    If you physically can't hold the angle long enough in the downswing and get an arched left wrist into impact, then what type of things should you be doing to make decent ball contact and play golf with an early release?

    For example should you learn to pick the ball (less down), put the ball in a certain position in your stance, etc., etc..

    Basically, what should you try to do to better hustle your ball around a golf course and play decent golf with an early release?
    You don't need brute strength to have a lot of lag. The PGA Tour is full of people who aren't strong by any reasonable measure. Rather it is their technique, sequencing, timing, etc that promotes lag and/or some forward shaft lean at impact. Having some lag is an effect of doing a lot of other things correct. That's why we see it in virtually all high quality swings. Having said that you can become overly enamored with some "look" and then too much lag (or forward shaft lean) may be counter-productive.

    The short answer is "yes" to your question. If your short game is solid you most certainly don't need boat loads of lag at impact. Maybe you won't hit the ball as far, but that doesn't mean you can't score. But you probably need at least a decent amount of clubFACE control too. That goes to how repeatable your shots will be.

    The best players I know are always awesome from 100 yards and in. They can putt and they can pitch on to the green from virtually any lie. They get out of the bunkers in one shot. In short, they have a "disaster free" short game.

    Erik
    I once shot 70, then I had to play 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keefer View Post
    If you physically can't hold the angle long enough in the downswing and get an arched left wrist into impact, then what type of things should you be doing to make decent ball contact and play golf with an early release?

    For example should you learn to pick the ball (less down), put the ball in a certain position in your stance, etc., etc..

    Basically, what should you try to do to better hustle your ball around a golf course and play decent golf with an early release?
    What angle are you trying to hold?
    Kevin Shields

    www.shieldsembroiderybydesign.com

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    Senior Member dschultz6072's Avatar
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    The more I think about it, the more I am starting to believe the only reason a world class or just great player has forward lean at impact is to hit the middle of the face. It's just something that happens when the ball is struck properly. Backward lean would be hitting low on the face, too much forward lean would be hitting high on the face. I don't believe someone who strikes the ball well with sufficient dynamic loft to produce a soft landing shot is trying to "hold" anything. To me, lag is something built naturally, and must be released naturally in order to hit the desired shot.

    That might be the way it is, or it might not. But the less I think about leaning the shaft forward, and the more I just try to hit the ball with a good amount of loft, the better off I am.
    faux_maestro likes this.
    Fast backswing, caddie yard grip, and a pocket full of money.

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    Keefer,

    Exhibit A of a golfer with physical limitations is my dad. He has Parkinson's. Here is a look at his swing from a year ago:

    CIMG1344_2 - YouTube

    MASSIVE early release! To combat it, his teacher here in Austin and I have persuaded him to adopt a strong grip. Now, despite the Parkinson's, he's shooting lower scores than he did five years ago! Consistent draws! He used to hit tons of weak floaters to the right. Now his misses go left! I'm giving him fewer and fewer strokes. He's looking forward to playing every time he tees it up.

    Why is a strong grip beneficial? This video should give you an idea:



    All that said, ignore what Cook says after 1:04. You don't want a neutral grip. The stronger your left-hand and right-hand grip the better.

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    Senior Member dschultz6072's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lifter View Post
    All that said, ignore what Cook says after 1:04. You don't want a neutral grip. The stronger your left-hand and right-hand grip the better.
    Why? What does it do (or promote?)
    Fast backswing, caddie yard grip, and a pocket full of money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dschultz6072 View Post
    Why? What does it do (or promote?)
    I think my dad is a good example of what a strong grip can do for physically limited golfers.

    My dad still casts. But the stronger grip has turned his giant-mega-cast into merely a significant cast.

    Not exciting if you're a low-handicapper but to him it's miraculous.

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    How? I'm just curious. Not trying to start anything, just interested in the reasoning.
    Fast backswing, caddie yard grip, and a pocket full of money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dschultz6072 View Post
    How? I'm just curious. Not trying to start anything, just interested in the reasoning.
    For many high-handicappers, giant-mega-cast + strong grip = Closed clubface at impact (and huge miss left).

    To avoid the huge miss left, the golfer instinctively reduces his early casting.

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