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Thread: .....use the ground for leverage?

  1. #1
    DDL
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    Default .....use the ground for leverage?

    Sitdown, squat. Use the ground for leverage. Sounds great in theory, but how does one do it? The only ting I can think of , and have experienced to a degree, is to be flatfooted at impact. However no one on Tour is flatfooted at impact. Everyone has their right heel pulled off before impact. So how is using the ground for leverage accopmplished? I don't detect a squat or sitdown in your swing ,Brian.

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    Senior Member birdie_man's Avatar
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    You don't actually squat on purpose...as in you don't lower yourself with your knees/thighs (squatting motion).

    I think the "squatting" motion you see on the downswing is just delaying the driving of the right leg/knee until the last moment. This sustains lag.

    Now...using the ground for leverage would be more with the left side/leg...you might have heard of "posting up," or "creating a wall with your left side." This is using the ground for leverage. Your must be on your back foot at the top of your swing. You then transfer it left (this is the "squatting" position you see- weight is centred to slightly forward) and then more on your left foot for the last part of the downswing before you release your lag and hit the ball. How you get you weight to the left side is debateable, and different from player to player, but you must do it.

    These motions should blend together in the downswing and not be too deliberate.

    When Tiger snaps his left leg straight it is for extra leverage.

    As for players flatfooted at impact, look at Chad Campbell.

    Perhaps Brian can elaborate on this and/or give a drill.

    Take it away.

    NOTE: Edited from original post.
    "birdie_man" guy

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    You are ALWAYS using the ground for leverage.

    You could push into the ground with a slightly lifted right foot the same amount you do with a flat one.

    "All you have is the HUB PATH and the force and torque you apply to the club—that's the whole swing."

    Brian Manzella is Golf Digest's 37th ranked teacher in the USA and is a three time Golf Magazine Top 100 Instructor.

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    Senior Member Burner's Avatar
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    Any so called leverage obtained from the ground is simply the resistance to the downswing force - Newton's third law of motion; roughly translated, any action has an equal and opposite reaction.

    It would not be possible to make a downswing without this reaction force.
    IB

    "My only handicap is me"!!!

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    But burner...you CAN LEARN to use the ground!
    "All you have is the HUB PATH and the force and torque you apply to the club—that's the whole swing."

    Brian Manzella is Golf Digest's 37th ranked teacher in the USA and is a three time Golf Magazine Top 100 Instructor.

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    quote:Originally posted by brianman

    But burner...you CAN LAERN to use the ground!
    That would involve bending and straightening the knees if "leverage" is the objective.

    Bracing your left side against the forces driven into it by the right side is a different matter though - and you seem to do it quite effectively.
    IB

    "My only handicap is me"!!!

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    I believe it was Snead who said that "good players hit the ball with their hands, great players use their feet"

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    hcw
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    ddl,
    i think this question intersects with a discussion myself, burner, and a few others were having over at lynn's place...there we wandered into anlaogies of ball throwing (baseball and cricket:-) and i found this site on the biomechanics of cricket bowling:

    http://www.rlca.com.pk/biomechanics.asp

    ...check out Figure 4. and the two paragraphs above it...i found the reference to javelin throwers interesting given brian's analogy of throwing a javelin underhanded for golf...note: i think the hip bump/slide/rotation in golf = the run up+leap in cricket bowling...i think for maximal acceleration from TOS one gets the whole assembly started with the hips and then catapults (flails) the the shoulders->arms->hands->club over the lead leg/foot...you've got to use the ground for leverage to do that...i think the sitdown/squat analogy is dangerous b/c it can mask what you really want to do which is move the weight over the lead leg and instead have you keep it over the trail leg and cause a nasty reverse pivot (which i have done for years and only recently come to realize why thanks to brian, lynn, and chuck's forums)...i'll let burner have the last word here if he so desires...cheers!

    -hcw

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    Default Knee bend and waist bend

    Quote Originally Posted by DDL View Post
    Sitdown, squat. Use the ground for leverage. Sounds great in theory, but how does one do it? The only ting I can think of , and have experienced to a degree, is to be flatfooted at impact. However no one on Tour is flatfooted at impact. Everyone has their right heel pulled off before impact. So how is using the ground for leverage accopmplished? I don't detect a squat or sitdown in your swing ,Brian.
    The proof is in the pudding. I think the amount of knee bend or waist bend depends of the size, shape, flexibility, etc of the player.
    I try to keep an open mind, and I consider accuracy, power, will the swing hold up over several rounds, does the setup you experiment with lead to injuries. Every adjustment I make, I make to compensate for the fact that I am not a machine, but a live person.

    As an example I bend me knees a little extra at address, so that I can gain leverage from the ground during the downswing.
    I also do this because I am very inflexible and to get any powerful coil, I need to be a little bit closer to the ground during the backswing.
    Of course Pro golfers like Tiger and Rory, do a bit of a squat to start the downswing, however when I try that, I do not have time to straighten back up before imipact and my knees shake and get weak when I try to recover from the downswing squat.

    Since my ablility to activate muscles is rather slow, I have to preset the squat at address.
    If you can increase your leverage from the ground up so that you can gain more clubhead speed and hit the ball more solid, then no one has the right to be absolutely sure you are doing the wrong thing.

    Golf should be considered a level playing field for ideas and practices.For me to get into an athletic position I seem to have to bend my knees more than the average player. Because my torso is very rigid and non flexible, if I do not squat a bit more at address, it is almost impossible for me to create a powerful coil. My goal is to create a powerful coil can then use leverage from the ground up, to release that power.

    Everyone has a different body with different limitations. If you do something and it works, do not worry that someone who has a golf teaching theory tells you that you are doing the wrong thing. If it works and you can do it without injuring yourself, then you have a swing that chooses you. We might not be able to choose a swing. However for each golfer there is a swing that chooses them at that time in their journey.

    Good Regards

    LukeDaniel
    JonWil likes this.

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    It's pretty simple....down by the ball, the ONLY THING YOU CAN DO to effective add something to the clubhead is by pulling the top part of the handle UP and back toward the golfer.

    It is the culmination of what I call GOING NORMAL, a phrase I coined.

    Going Normal is simply the process of going from pulling on the club lengthwise to pulling back on the top of the handle toward yourself.

    And, the golfer's best friend in this endeavor is the lengthening of the lead side.

    FROM THE GROUND UP TOWARD YOUR LEAD-SIDE EAR!!!

    BOOM
    "All you have is the HUB PATH and the force and torque you apply to the club—that's the whole swing."

    Brian Manzella is Golf Digest's 37th ranked teacher in the USA and is a three time Golf Magazine Top 100 Instructor.

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